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Spanish Exile in numbers

200,000, 700,000 or 2,000,000?

It’s difficult to determine the exact number of Spaniards that have emigrated due to the economic crisis. Although it’s true that in the beginning the political leaders tried to make light of the situation with expressions like “external mobility”, whilst denying the existence of a “brain drain”, now, with objective figures attesting to the decline of Spain’s population, they are beginning to timidly recognize the true dimension of the problem.

This is how we're leaving

Some figures on the new wave of Spanish emigration


Amparo González Ferrer’s 700,000

Amparo González Ferrer’s 700,000

To try to estimate a more realistic figure, Amparo González compared the INE's figures with the figures for the arrival of Spaniards in the UK and Germany.

The INE Statistics

The INE Statistics

The INE statistics are useless for knowing exactly how many people have gone, but they point to a trend: the number of people leaving Spain keeps growing.

Carmen González’ 40,000

Carmen González’ 40,000

The 40,000 migrants accounted for by Carmen González refer only to the Spaniards born in Spain who have bothered to register in a consulate abroad.

Where do Spaniards Emigrate?

Where do Spaniards Emigrate?

Contrary to what most people may think, more young Spaniards are emigrating to the U.K. than to Germany.

Where do they emigrate the most?

Where do they emigrate the most?

Spaniards from Valencia en Baleares lead the list of Spanish provinces with the highest numbers of emigration in 2013.

What ages emigrate

What ages emigrate

What ages are the people that emigrate? Mainly people between the ages of 25-40 are emigrating from Spain.

Is there a Brain Drain?

Is there a Brain Drain?

The authorities want to deny that there is a brain drain, but the fact is that about 90% of young Spaniards residing abroad are university graduates, especially holders of Bachelors and Masters degrees.

Return to Spain

Return to Spain

More than half of the Spanish emigrées do not know when or iof they will return to Spain or if they will stya in their new country to save up some money.

Migrants’ Perception of Spain

Migrants’ Perception of Spain

The bad economic situation in their country perceived by the youth in Spain is one of the key triggers for emigration. The majority thinks that the situation is "very bad" or "bad"


Thanks to the different groups that have surged in the last year protesting in the media against the “forced exile” of a significant portion of the population, the phenomenon has become visible to the general society. Without the actions carried out by groups such as Marea Granate, Juventud sin Futuro, la Federación de Jóvenes Investigadores and us here at Spanish Exile,  the perception that  Spain’s best educated generation is being forced into exile would not be consolidated and widely accepted as it is today.

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